Japanese pumpkin
Japanese pumpkin
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The Japanese pumpkin is a squash fruit, usually orange in color when ripe (although there are also white, red, and gray varieties) The pumpkin varies greatly in form, being sometimes nearly globular, but more generally oblong or ovoid in shape. The rind is smooth and its color depends on the particular species (very dark-green, very pale-green, & orange-yellow are common). The larger kinds acquire a weight of 40 to 80 lb (18 to 36 kg) but smaller varieties are in vogue for garden culture. Pumpkins are a po
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The Japanese pumpkin is a squash fruit, usually orange in color when ripe (although there are also white, red, and gray varieties)
The pumpkin varies greatly in form, being sometimes nearly globular, but more generally oblong or ovoid in shape. The rind is smooth and its color depends on the particular species (very dark-green, very pale-green, & orange-yellow are common). The larger kinds acquire a weight of 40 to 80 lb (18 to 36 kg) but smaller varieties are in vogue for garden culture. Pumpkins are a popular food, with their insides commonly eaten cooked and served in dishes such as pumpkin pie; the seeds can be roasted as a snack.

The bright orange color of pumpkin is a dead giveaway that pumpkin is loaded with an important antioxidant, alpha and beta-carotene. Beta-carotene is one of the plant carotenoids converted to vitamin A in the body. In the conversion to vitamin A, beta carotene performs many important functions in overall health. It’s a good source of vitamins C, K, and E, and lots of minerals, including magnesium, potassium, and iron. 
Current research indicates that a diet rich in foods containing beta-carotene may reduce the risk of developing certain types of cancer and offers protect against heart disease. 
Not only is pumpkin loaded with vitamin A and antioxidant carotenoids, particularly alpha and beta-carotenes, 
Half a cup of canned pumpkin has 6.5 grams of effective carbohydrate and 3.5 grams of fiber.

 

Pumpkin seeds are loaded with minerals, seem to have an anti-inflammatory effect, and may even help protect against prostate cancer and osteoporosis. A quarter cup has about 5 grams of effective carb and 1.5 grams of fiber.


Calories 49
Protein 2 grams
Carbohydrate 12 grams
Dietary Fiber/Chất xơ 3 grams
Calcium 37 mg
Iron 1.4 mg
Magnesium 22 mg
Potassium/ Kali 564 mg
Zinc/ Kẽm 1 mg
Selenium .50 mg
Vitamin C 12 mg
Niacin 1 mg
Folate 21 mcg
Vitamin A 2650 IU
Vitamin E 3 mg
 

For cooking, you want a pumpkin that is heavy for its size. The lighter ones are drier, with a bigger open space in the middle. For the most part, stay away from the large pumpkins when selecting a pumpkin for eating – 2 to 5 lbs is about right. 
Pumpkins can keep for a month in a cool (ideally 50 to 60 degrees) dry place such as an attic or spare room (root cellars are too damp) or refrigerate for up to three months. Put newspapers underneath just in case, though. Once the pumpkin is cut open, you need to use it within a couple of days (or freeze it) as it can mold quickly.

For extended storage, wash skins in a solution of about a tablespoon of chlorine bleach to a gallon of water to disinfect the skin and discourage mold or rot. Dry immediately as dampness encourages spoilage. If you find mold, wipe with vegetable oil to remove the mold and seal the spot. 
Cooked, it’s fine in the refrigerator for 4 to 5 days. Leftover cooked pumpkin can be frozen up to 16 months or canned.